Affiliated member of the WPA – World Psychiatric Association

Abstract Sorokin, M. Yu.; Lutova, N.B.; Wied, V. D.

Subjective perception of psychosis: paths of treatment engagement and govern aggression

Patients willingness not to suffer from mental disorder do not always lead to their treatment engagement. 160 inpatients with severe mental disorders were assessed. Patients rated their subjective severity of the current condition with visual-analog scale. Experience of psychosis questionnaire (SuSe) was used to determine components of patients’ perception of illness (Klapheck et al., 2012; adapted Lutova et. al., 2018). Structure of motivation for treatment was revealed with the Treatment motivation assessment questionnaire (TMAQ) and it`s 4 factors (Sorokin et al., 2017). Correlation analysis was performed with p-value ≤0,05. Results: The high subjective severity of condition was associated with both the negative subjective experience of symptoms (r=0.283) and perception of destructive consequences of psychosis (r=0.414). Patients comprehension of the need for treatment (TMAQ factor 2) was associated with the high subjective severity of current condition (r=0.378) and only the negative subjective experience of symptoms (r=0.218). In opposite patients’ perception of destructive consequences of psychosis was connected with demotivated state (TMAQ factors 1 and 4): weak reliance on knowledge and skills to overcome the disease (r=-0.18) and low willingness to actively collaborate with doctor (r=-0.196). Conclusions: Perception of mental disorder as a destructive event of life in psychiatric inpatients was connected with deficient aggression in terms of refusing patients’ collaboration and activeness in treatment process. The negative subjective experience of symptoms helped patients to refer their aggression against illness in constructive way mainly with the high comprehension of the need for treatment.

Sorokin, M. Yu.; Lutova, N. B.; Wied, V. D.
V.M.Bekhterev National Medical Research Center of Psychiatry and Neurology, St. Petersburg, Russia

 

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